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psych2go:

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Psych2go features various psychological findings and myths. In the future, psych2go attempts to include sources to posts for the purpose of generating discussions and commentaries. This will give readers a chance to critically examine psychology.

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(Source: nepetaquest)

raze-occam:

mick—-jaeger:

For all your Ghibli needs*.

Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind ♢ [Sub] ♢ [Dub] ♢

Laputa : Castle in the Sky ♢ [Sub] ♢ [Dub] ♢

Grave of the Fireflies ♢ [Sub] ♢ [Dub] ♢

My Neighbor Totoro ♢ [Sub] ♢ [Dub] ♢

Kiki’s Delivery Service ♢ [Sub] ♢ [Dub] ♢

Only Yesterday ♢ [Sub] ♢

Porco Rosso ♢ [Sub] ♢ [Dub] ♢

Ocean Waves ♢ [Sub] ♢

Pom Poko ♢ [Sub] ♢ [Dub]

Whisper of the Heart ♢ [Sub] ♢ [Dub] ♢

Princess Mononoke ♢ [Sub] ♢ [Dub] ♢

My Neighbors the Yamadas ♢ [Sub] ♢ [Dub] ♢

Spirited Away ♢ [Sub] ♢ [Dub] ♢

The Cat Returns ♢ [Dub] ♢

Howl’s Moving Castle ♢ [Sub] ♢ [Dub]

Tales from Earthsea ♢ [Dub] ♢

Ponyo  ♢ [Sub] ♢ [Dub] ♢

Arrietty ♢ [Sub] ♢ [Dub] ♢

From Up on Poppy Hill ♢ [Sub[Dub

The Wind Rises ♢ [Sub♢ [Dub

*Currently, I have not found any links for “The Tale of Princess Kaguya”, but if you do find one, let me know because that’d be really great !

aronjshay:

Hey guys! Here’s the basic stuff I’ve been using. I’ll elaborate more on this later but I wanted to give you the general outline so you can check it out for yourselves!
I’m using Reeves brand Gouache (24 color set) to learn with. Brands like Windsor and Newton can be a little expensive and are often sold per-tube. Reeves has been a good basic starter brand for me so I don’t break the bank. It may have less pigments in it which can mean less opacity if you thin it with too much water so just play with it to test out what you can do with it.This set cost me a little over $13 USD but you might be able to find it cheaper elsewhere or online.
I bought a tube of Windsor and Newton Permanent White for better coverage and mixing. It cost me over $5 for that white but I will get a lot of mileage out of it since I’m producing smaller cartoon style pieces.
I also own a tube of Opera Pink because I wanted a hot bright neon pink gouache. That was over $9 and an investment that I weighed against having a dull pink made from red and white. I can get a lot of use out of it and tint and tweak it with other colors like blue as well. Bright hot colors are harder to produce and thats why they usually cost more. W&N is sold by series meaning some colors cost more than others. Be careful if you start out with that brand and buy single tubes at a store because it can add up fast. It’s wonderful paint though!
I also am using a folding plastic palette. That was maybe $5 and I got it in the palette section of the store. I’ll go into details about why soon.
Brushes are cheap. Don’t worry about crazy good brushes. As long as you keep them from sitting in water, and wash them gently, and dry them— they can last you a LONG time. I use Princeton Real Value line brushes and anything cheap I can find. I kid you not, these Real Value sets are inexpensive and there are so many varieties! Some of the brushes I have came in a holiday issue Reeves Watercolor set and they work great!
My Fionna and Cake painting is on a Birch Panel. Wood panels are cool because they’re flat, and strong. Plus, you don’t need to frame them. The American Easel brand is pretty inexpensive and they are very nice. I stained this one purple with watercolor brushed on to allow the grain to continue through. I did ruin a panel though. I bought one and soaked it in fabric dye to get a bright pink. The color and grain look amazing but the wood bracers on the back warped and bent, releasing from the glue. BUMMER!! I’ll have to hand-brush the color on next time. I still recommend fabric dye like RIT, DYLON and any other dye— for wood staining.
You can also do gouache painting on paper, illustration board— ANYTHING flat! Google around and look at some gouache paintings to see what people use :)
Great things about gouache:
Water Soluble (you can thin it with water).
It dries super flat and matte (not glossy like most acrylics).
You can re-wet it after it dries. Saves you from wasting paint dried on a palette. I’ve found that a few spritzes from a mister spray bottle keep it workable really well!
Great opacity! Bright colors that stand out more than transparent watercolors. 
Links for places I’ve researched. NOTE: some of these painters lay the paint on thick. It’s not my style, and I’m not a painterly person who blends a lot. I’m aiming for bright graphic looks similar to Mary Blair and other vintage artists. I’m a cartoon artist who is aiming for a cartoon look.
Ralph Parker’s Gouache page (painterly)
The Color Journey (good process outline, painterly)
EHow (lol) explains the basics behind gouache.
Some watercolor techniques that explain wet on wet, wet on dry, if those terms are confusing, lol.
Wikipedia… kinda odd.
NOTES ABOUT GOUACHE:
Since it’s something that can be re-hydrated, be careful. You may want to keep a portfolio book or case handy to keep finished work in. It dries quick but be careful because if you rest your hand on a spot that’s tacky, it pulls it all back up. Blah!
Since paints can contain toxins, please exercise usual care. Even if it says non-toxic, I try not to keep my water cups near my drinking water because you never know, lol. 
One artist notes that you can use a clear spray varnish on the finished work BUT he warns to do a test with a piece or a swatch that you don’t care about since clear coats can adjust the appearance of the finished paint. 
Keep paper towels handy to blot your brushes on. A drop of water from the handle of a brush that you just rinshed, can leave an ugly splotch on your piece.
Some people argue that distilled water is best for thinning with. I just use tap water lol.
Gouache covers well and pencil sketches should not be too hard to cover up. Test it out when in doubt.
Zoom Info
aronjshay:

Hey guys! Here’s the basic stuff I’ve been using. I’ll elaborate more on this later but I wanted to give you the general outline so you can check it out for yourselves!
I’m using Reeves brand Gouache (24 color set) to learn with. Brands like Windsor and Newton can be a little expensive and are often sold per-tube. Reeves has been a good basic starter brand for me so I don’t break the bank. It may have less pigments in it which can mean less opacity if you thin it with too much water so just play with it to test out what you can do with it.This set cost me a little over $13 USD but you might be able to find it cheaper elsewhere or online.
I bought a tube of Windsor and Newton Permanent White for better coverage and mixing. It cost me over $5 for that white but I will get a lot of mileage out of it since I’m producing smaller cartoon style pieces.
I also own a tube of Opera Pink because I wanted a hot bright neon pink gouache. That was over $9 and an investment that I weighed against having a dull pink made from red and white. I can get a lot of use out of it and tint and tweak it with other colors like blue as well. Bright hot colors are harder to produce and thats why they usually cost more. W&N is sold by series meaning some colors cost more than others. Be careful if you start out with that brand and buy single tubes at a store because it can add up fast. It’s wonderful paint though!
I also am using a folding plastic palette. That was maybe $5 and I got it in the palette section of the store. I’ll go into details about why soon.
Brushes are cheap. Don’t worry about crazy good brushes. As long as you keep them from sitting in water, and wash them gently, and dry them— they can last you a LONG time. I use Princeton Real Value line brushes and anything cheap I can find. I kid you not, these Real Value sets are inexpensive and there are so many varieties! Some of the brushes I have came in a holiday issue Reeves Watercolor set and they work great!
My Fionna and Cake painting is on a Birch Panel. Wood panels are cool because they’re flat, and strong. Plus, you don’t need to frame them. The American Easel brand is pretty inexpensive and they are very nice. I stained this one purple with watercolor brushed on to allow the grain to continue through. I did ruin a panel though. I bought one and soaked it in fabric dye to get a bright pink. The color and grain look amazing but the wood bracers on the back warped and bent, releasing from the glue. BUMMER!! I’ll have to hand-brush the color on next time. I still recommend fabric dye like RIT, DYLON and any other dye— for wood staining.
You can also do gouache painting on paper, illustration board— ANYTHING flat! Google around and look at some gouache paintings to see what people use :)
Great things about gouache:
Water Soluble (you can thin it with water).
It dries super flat and matte (not glossy like most acrylics).
You can re-wet it after it dries. Saves you from wasting paint dried on a palette. I’ve found that a few spritzes from a mister spray bottle keep it workable really well!
Great opacity! Bright colors that stand out more than transparent watercolors. 
Links for places I’ve researched. NOTE: some of these painters lay the paint on thick. It’s not my style, and I’m not a painterly person who blends a lot. I’m aiming for bright graphic looks similar to Mary Blair and other vintage artists. I’m a cartoon artist who is aiming for a cartoon look.
Ralph Parker’s Gouache page (painterly)
The Color Journey (good process outline, painterly)
EHow (lol) explains the basics behind gouache.
Some watercolor techniques that explain wet on wet, wet on dry, if those terms are confusing, lol.
Wikipedia… kinda odd.
NOTES ABOUT GOUACHE:
Since it’s something that can be re-hydrated, be careful. You may want to keep a portfolio book or case handy to keep finished work in. It dries quick but be careful because if you rest your hand on a spot that’s tacky, it pulls it all back up. Blah!
Since paints can contain toxins, please exercise usual care. Even if it says non-toxic, I try not to keep my water cups near my drinking water because you never know, lol. 
One artist notes that you can use a clear spray varnish on the finished work BUT he warns to do a test with a piece or a swatch that you don’t care about since clear coats can adjust the appearance of the finished paint. 
Keep paper towels handy to blot your brushes on. A drop of water from the handle of a brush that you just rinshed, can leave an ugly splotch on your piece.
Some people argue that distilled water is best for thinning with. I just use tap water lol.
Gouache covers well and pencil sketches should not be too hard to cover up. Test it out when in doubt.
Zoom Info
aronjshay:

Hey guys! Here’s the basic stuff I’ve been using. I’ll elaborate more on this later but I wanted to give you the general outline so you can check it out for yourselves!
I’m using Reeves brand Gouache (24 color set) to learn with. Brands like Windsor and Newton can be a little expensive and are often sold per-tube. Reeves has been a good basic starter brand for me so I don’t break the bank. It may have less pigments in it which can mean less opacity if you thin it with too much water so just play with it to test out what you can do with it.This set cost me a little over $13 USD but you might be able to find it cheaper elsewhere or online.
I bought a tube of Windsor and Newton Permanent White for better coverage and mixing. It cost me over $5 for that white but I will get a lot of mileage out of it since I’m producing smaller cartoon style pieces.
I also own a tube of Opera Pink because I wanted a hot bright neon pink gouache. That was over $9 and an investment that I weighed against having a dull pink made from red and white. I can get a lot of use out of it and tint and tweak it with other colors like blue as well. Bright hot colors are harder to produce and thats why they usually cost more. W&N is sold by series meaning some colors cost more than others. Be careful if you start out with that brand and buy single tubes at a store because it can add up fast. It’s wonderful paint though!
I also am using a folding plastic palette. That was maybe $5 and I got it in the palette section of the store. I’ll go into details about why soon.
Brushes are cheap. Don’t worry about crazy good brushes. As long as you keep them from sitting in water, and wash them gently, and dry them— they can last you a LONG time. I use Princeton Real Value line brushes and anything cheap I can find. I kid you not, these Real Value sets are inexpensive and there are so many varieties! Some of the brushes I have came in a holiday issue Reeves Watercolor set and they work great!
My Fionna and Cake painting is on a Birch Panel. Wood panels are cool because they’re flat, and strong. Plus, you don’t need to frame them. The American Easel brand is pretty inexpensive and they are very nice. I stained this one purple with watercolor brushed on to allow the grain to continue through. I did ruin a panel though. I bought one and soaked it in fabric dye to get a bright pink. The color and grain look amazing but the wood bracers on the back warped and bent, releasing from the glue. BUMMER!! I’ll have to hand-brush the color on next time. I still recommend fabric dye like RIT, DYLON and any other dye— for wood staining.
You can also do gouache painting on paper, illustration board— ANYTHING flat! Google around and look at some gouache paintings to see what people use :)
Great things about gouache:
Water Soluble (you can thin it with water).
It dries super flat and matte (not glossy like most acrylics).
You can re-wet it after it dries. Saves you from wasting paint dried on a palette. I’ve found that a few spritzes from a mister spray bottle keep it workable really well!
Great opacity! Bright colors that stand out more than transparent watercolors. 
Links for places I’ve researched. NOTE: some of these painters lay the paint on thick. It’s not my style, and I’m not a painterly person who blends a lot. I’m aiming for bright graphic looks similar to Mary Blair and other vintage artists. I’m a cartoon artist who is aiming for a cartoon look.
Ralph Parker’s Gouache page (painterly)
The Color Journey (good process outline, painterly)
EHow (lol) explains the basics behind gouache.
Some watercolor techniques that explain wet on wet, wet on dry, if those terms are confusing, lol.
Wikipedia… kinda odd.
NOTES ABOUT GOUACHE:
Since it’s something that can be re-hydrated, be careful. You may want to keep a portfolio book or case handy to keep finished work in. It dries quick but be careful because if you rest your hand on a spot that’s tacky, it pulls it all back up. Blah!
Since paints can contain toxins, please exercise usual care. Even if it says non-toxic, I try not to keep my water cups near my drinking water because you never know, lol. 
One artist notes that you can use a clear spray varnish on the finished work BUT he warns to do a test with a piece or a swatch that you don’t care about since clear coats can adjust the appearance of the finished paint. 
Keep paper towels handy to blot your brushes on. A drop of water from the handle of a brush that you just rinshed, can leave an ugly splotch on your piece.
Some people argue that distilled water is best for thinning with. I just use tap water lol.
Gouache covers well and pencil sketches should not be too hard to cover up. Test it out when in doubt.
Zoom Info
aronjshay:

Hey guys! Here’s the basic stuff I’ve been using. I’ll elaborate more on this later but I wanted to give you the general outline so you can check it out for yourselves!
I’m using Reeves brand Gouache (24 color set) to learn with. Brands like Windsor and Newton can be a little expensive and are often sold per-tube. Reeves has been a good basic starter brand for me so I don’t break the bank. It may have less pigments in it which can mean less opacity if you thin it with too much water so just play with it to test out what you can do with it.This set cost me a little over $13 USD but you might be able to find it cheaper elsewhere or online.
I bought a tube of Windsor and Newton Permanent White for better coverage and mixing. It cost me over $5 for that white but I will get a lot of mileage out of it since I’m producing smaller cartoon style pieces.
I also own a tube of Opera Pink because I wanted a hot bright neon pink gouache. That was over $9 and an investment that I weighed against having a dull pink made from red and white. I can get a lot of use out of it and tint and tweak it with other colors like blue as well. Bright hot colors are harder to produce and thats why they usually cost more. W&N is sold by series meaning some colors cost more than others. Be careful if you start out with that brand and buy single tubes at a store because it can add up fast. It’s wonderful paint though!
I also am using a folding plastic palette. That was maybe $5 and I got it in the palette section of the store. I’ll go into details about why soon.
Brushes are cheap. Don’t worry about crazy good brushes. As long as you keep them from sitting in water, and wash them gently, and dry them— they can last you a LONG time. I use Princeton Real Value line brushes and anything cheap I can find. I kid you not, these Real Value sets are inexpensive and there are so many varieties! Some of the brushes I have came in a holiday issue Reeves Watercolor set and they work great!
My Fionna and Cake painting is on a Birch Panel. Wood panels are cool because they’re flat, and strong. Plus, you don’t need to frame them. The American Easel brand is pretty inexpensive and they are very nice. I stained this one purple with watercolor brushed on to allow the grain to continue through. I did ruin a panel though. I bought one and soaked it in fabric dye to get a bright pink. The color and grain look amazing but the wood bracers on the back warped and bent, releasing from the glue. BUMMER!! I’ll have to hand-brush the color on next time. I still recommend fabric dye like RIT, DYLON and any other dye— for wood staining.
You can also do gouache painting on paper, illustration board— ANYTHING flat! Google around and look at some gouache paintings to see what people use :)
Great things about gouache:
Water Soluble (you can thin it with water).
It dries super flat and matte (not glossy like most acrylics).
You can re-wet it after it dries. Saves you from wasting paint dried on a palette. I’ve found that a few spritzes from a mister spray bottle keep it workable really well!
Great opacity! Bright colors that stand out more than transparent watercolors. 
Links for places I’ve researched. NOTE: some of these painters lay the paint on thick. It’s not my style, and I’m not a painterly person who blends a lot. I’m aiming for bright graphic looks similar to Mary Blair and other vintage artists. I’m a cartoon artist who is aiming for a cartoon look.
Ralph Parker’s Gouache page (painterly)
The Color Journey (good process outline, painterly)
EHow (lol) explains the basics behind gouache.
Some watercolor techniques that explain wet on wet, wet on dry, if those terms are confusing, lol.
Wikipedia… kinda odd.
NOTES ABOUT GOUACHE:
Since it’s something that can be re-hydrated, be careful. You may want to keep a portfolio book or case handy to keep finished work in. It dries quick but be careful because if you rest your hand on a spot that’s tacky, it pulls it all back up. Blah!
Since paints can contain toxins, please exercise usual care. Even if it says non-toxic, I try not to keep my water cups near my drinking water because you never know, lol. 
One artist notes that you can use a clear spray varnish on the finished work BUT he warns to do a test with a piece or a swatch that you don’t care about since clear coats can adjust the appearance of the finished paint. 
Keep paper towels handy to blot your brushes on. A drop of water from the handle of a brush that you just rinshed, can leave an ugly splotch on your piece.
Some people argue that distilled water is best for thinning with. I just use tap water lol.
Gouache covers well and pencil sketches should not be too hard to cover up. Test it out when in doubt.
Zoom Info
aronjshay:

Hey guys! Here’s the basic stuff I’ve been using. I’ll elaborate more on this later but I wanted to give you the general outline so you can check it out for yourselves!
I’m using Reeves brand Gouache (24 color set) to learn with. Brands like Windsor and Newton can be a little expensive and are often sold per-tube. Reeves has been a good basic starter brand for me so I don’t break the bank. It may have less pigments in it which can mean less opacity if you thin it with too much water so just play with it to test out what you can do with it.This set cost me a little over $13 USD but you might be able to find it cheaper elsewhere or online.
I bought a tube of Windsor and Newton Permanent White for better coverage and mixing. It cost me over $5 for that white but I will get a lot of mileage out of it since I’m producing smaller cartoon style pieces.
I also own a tube of Opera Pink because I wanted a hot bright neon pink gouache. That was over $9 and an investment that I weighed against having a dull pink made from red and white. I can get a lot of use out of it and tint and tweak it with other colors like blue as well. Bright hot colors are harder to produce and thats why they usually cost more. W&N is sold by series meaning some colors cost more than others. Be careful if you start out with that brand and buy single tubes at a store because it can add up fast. It’s wonderful paint though!
I also am using a folding plastic palette. That was maybe $5 and I got it in the palette section of the store. I’ll go into details about why soon.
Brushes are cheap. Don’t worry about crazy good brushes. As long as you keep them from sitting in water, and wash them gently, and dry them— they can last you a LONG time. I use Princeton Real Value line brushes and anything cheap I can find. I kid you not, these Real Value sets are inexpensive and there are so many varieties! Some of the brushes I have came in a holiday issue Reeves Watercolor set and they work great!
My Fionna and Cake painting is on a Birch Panel. Wood panels are cool because they’re flat, and strong. Plus, you don’t need to frame them. The American Easel brand is pretty inexpensive and they are very nice. I stained this one purple with watercolor brushed on to allow the grain to continue through. I did ruin a panel though. I bought one and soaked it in fabric dye to get a bright pink. The color and grain look amazing but the wood bracers on the back warped and bent, releasing from the glue. BUMMER!! I’ll have to hand-brush the color on next time. I still recommend fabric dye like RIT, DYLON and any other dye— for wood staining.
You can also do gouache painting on paper, illustration board— ANYTHING flat! Google around and look at some gouache paintings to see what people use :)
Great things about gouache:
Water Soluble (you can thin it with water).
It dries super flat and matte (not glossy like most acrylics).
You can re-wet it after it dries. Saves you from wasting paint dried on a palette. I’ve found that a few spritzes from a mister spray bottle keep it workable really well!
Great opacity! Bright colors that stand out more than transparent watercolors. 
Links for places I’ve researched. NOTE: some of these painters lay the paint on thick. It’s not my style, and I’m not a painterly person who blends a lot. I’m aiming for bright graphic looks similar to Mary Blair and other vintage artists. I’m a cartoon artist who is aiming for a cartoon look.
Ralph Parker’s Gouache page (painterly)
The Color Journey (good process outline, painterly)
EHow (lol) explains the basics behind gouache.
Some watercolor techniques that explain wet on wet, wet on dry, if those terms are confusing, lol.
Wikipedia… kinda odd.
NOTES ABOUT GOUACHE:
Since it’s something that can be re-hydrated, be careful. You may want to keep a portfolio book or case handy to keep finished work in. It dries quick but be careful because if you rest your hand on a spot that’s tacky, it pulls it all back up. Blah!
Since paints can contain toxins, please exercise usual care. Even if it says non-toxic, I try not to keep my water cups near my drinking water because you never know, lol. 
One artist notes that you can use a clear spray varnish on the finished work BUT he warns to do a test with a piece or a swatch that you don’t care about since clear coats can adjust the appearance of the finished paint. 
Keep paper towels handy to blot your brushes on. A drop of water from the handle of a brush that you just rinshed, can leave an ugly splotch on your piece.
Some people argue that distilled water is best for thinning with. I just use tap water lol.
Gouache covers well and pencil sketches should not be too hard to cover up. Test it out when in doubt.
Zoom Info
aronjshay:

Hey guys! Here’s the basic stuff I’ve been using. I’ll elaborate more on this later but I wanted to give you the general outline so you can check it out for yourselves!
I’m using Reeves brand Gouache (24 color set) to learn with. Brands like Windsor and Newton can be a little expensive and are often sold per-tube. Reeves has been a good basic starter brand for me so I don’t break the bank. It may have less pigments in it which can mean less opacity if you thin it with too much water so just play with it to test out what you can do with it.This set cost me a little over $13 USD but you might be able to find it cheaper elsewhere or online.
I bought a tube of Windsor and Newton Permanent White for better coverage and mixing. It cost me over $5 for that white but I will get a lot of mileage out of it since I’m producing smaller cartoon style pieces.
I also own a tube of Opera Pink because I wanted a hot bright neon pink gouache. That was over $9 and an investment that I weighed against having a dull pink made from red and white. I can get a lot of use out of it and tint and tweak it with other colors like blue as well. Bright hot colors are harder to produce and thats why they usually cost more. W&N is sold by series meaning some colors cost more than others. Be careful if you start out with that brand and buy single tubes at a store because it can add up fast. It’s wonderful paint though!
I also am using a folding plastic palette. That was maybe $5 and I got it in the palette section of the store. I’ll go into details about why soon.
Brushes are cheap. Don’t worry about crazy good brushes. As long as you keep them from sitting in water, and wash them gently, and dry them— they can last you a LONG time. I use Princeton Real Value line brushes and anything cheap I can find. I kid you not, these Real Value sets are inexpensive and there are so many varieties! Some of the brushes I have came in a holiday issue Reeves Watercolor set and they work great!
My Fionna and Cake painting is on a Birch Panel. Wood panels are cool because they’re flat, and strong. Plus, you don’t need to frame them. The American Easel brand is pretty inexpensive and they are very nice. I stained this one purple with watercolor brushed on to allow the grain to continue through. I did ruin a panel though. I bought one and soaked it in fabric dye to get a bright pink. The color and grain look amazing but the wood bracers on the back warped and bent, releasing from the glue. BUMMER!! I’ll have to hand-brush the color on next time. I still recommend fabric dye like RIT, DYLON and any other dye— for wood staining.
You can also do gouache painting on paper, illustration board— ANYTHING flat! Google around and look at some gouache paintings to see what people use :)
Great things about gouache:
Water Soluble (you can thin it with water).
It dries super flat and matte (not glossy like most acrylics).
You can re-wet it after it dries. Saves you from wasting paint dried on a palette. I’ve found that a few spritzes from a mister spray bottle keep it workable really well!
Great opacity! Bright colors that stand out more than transparent watercolors. 
Links for places I’ve researched. NOTE: some of these painters lay the paint on thick. It’s not my style, and I’m not a painterly person who blends a lot. I’m aiming for bright graphic looks similar to Mary Blair and other vintage artists. I’m a cartoon artist who is aiming for a cartoon look.
Ralph Parker’s Gouache page (painterly)
The Color Journey (good process outline, painterly)
EHow (lol) explains the basics behind gouache.
Some watercolor techniques that explain wet on wet, wet on dry, if those terms are confusing, lol.
Wikipedia… kinda odd.
NOTES ABOUT GOUACHE:
Since it’s something that can be re-hydrated, be careful. You may want to keep a portfolio book or case handy to keep finished work in. It dries quick but be careful because if you rest your hand on a spot that’s tacky, it pulls it all back up. Blah!
Since paints can contain toxins, please exercise usual care. Even if it says non-toxic, I try not to keep my water cups near my drinking water because you never know, lol. 
One artist notes that you can use a clear spray varnish on the finished work BUT he warns to do a test with a piece or a swatch that you don’t care about since clear coats can adjust the appearance of the finished paint. 
Keep paper towels handy to blot your brushes on. A drop of water from the handle of a brush that you just rinshed, can leave an ugly splotch on your piece.
Some people argue that distilled water is best for thinning with. I just use tap water lol.
Gouache covers well and pencil sketches should not be too hard to cover up. Test it out when in doubt.
Zoom Info
aronjshay:

Hey guys! Here’s the basic stuff I’ve been using. I’ll elaborate more on this later but I wanted to give you the general outline so you can check it out for yourselves!
I’m using Reeves brand Gouache (24 color set) to learn with. Brands like Windsor and Newton can be a little expensive and are often sold per-tube. Reeves has been a good basic starter brand for me so I don’t break the bank. It may have less pigments in it which can mean less opacity if you thin it with too much water so just play with it to test out what you can do with it.This set cost me a little over $13 USD but you might be able to find it cheaper elsewhere or online.
I bought a tube of Windsor and Newton Permanent White for better coverage and mixing. It cost me over $5 for that white but I will get a lot of mileage out of it since I’m producing smaller cartoon style pieces.
I also own a tube of Opera Pink because I wanted a hot bright neon pink gouache. That was over $9 and an investment that I weighed against having a dull pink made from red and white. I can get a lot of use out of it and tint and tweak it with other colors like blue as well. Bright hot colors are harder to produce and thats why they usually cost more. W&N is sold by series meaning some colors cost more than others. Be careful if you start out with that brand and buy single tubes at a store because it can add up fast. It’s wonderful paint though!
I also am using a folding plastic palette. That was maybe $5 and I got it in the palette section of the store. I’ll go into details about why soon.
Brushes are cheap. Don’t worry about crazy good brushes. As long as you keep them from sitting in water, and wash them gently, and dry them— they can last you a LONG time. I use Princeton Real Value line brushes and anything cheap I can find. I kid you not, these Real Value sets are inexpensive and there are so many varieties! Some of the brushes I have came in a holiday issue Reeves Watercolor set and they work great!
My Fionna and Cake painting is on a Birch Panel. Wood panels are cool because they’re flat, and strong. Plus, you don’t need to frame them. The American Easel brand is pretty inexpensive and they are very nice. I stained this one purple with watercolor brushed on to allow the grain to continue through. I did ruin a panel though. I bought one and soaked it in fabric dye to get a bright pink. The color and grain look amazing but the wood bracers on the back warped and bent, releasing from the glue. BUMMER!! I’ll have to hand-brush the color on next time. I still recommend fabric dye like RIT, DYLON and any other dye— for wood staining.
You can also do gouache painting on paper, illustration board— ANYTHING flat! Google around and look at some gouache paintings to see what people use :)
Great things about gouache:
Water Soluble (you can thin it with water).
It dries super flat and matte (not glossy like most acrylics).
You can re-wet it after it dries. Saves you from wasting paint dried on a palette. I’ve found that a few spritzes from a mister spray bottle keep it workable really well!
Great opacity! Bright colors that stand out more than transparent watercolors. 
Links for places I’ve researched. NOTE: some of these painters lay the paint on thick. It’s not my style, and I’m not a painterly person who blends a lot. I’m aiming for bright graphic looks similar to Mary Blair and other vintage artists. I’m a cartoon artist who is aiming for a cartoon look.
Ralph Parker’s Gouache page (painterly)
The Color Journey (good process outline, painterly)
EHow (lol) explains the basics behind gouache.
Some watercolor techniques that explain wet on wet, wet on dry, if those terms are confusing, lol.
Wikipedia… kinda odd.
NOTES ABOUT GOUACHE:
Since it’s something that can be re-hydrated, be careful. You may want to keep a portfolio book or case handy to keep finished work in. It dries quick but be careful because if you rest your hand on a spot that’s tacky, it pulls it all back up. Blah!
Since paints can contain toxins, please exercise usual care. Even if it says non-toxic, I try not to keep my water cups near my drinking water because you never know, lol. 
One artist notes that you can use a clear spray varnish on the finished work BUT he warns to do a test with a piece or a swatch that you don’t care about since clear coats can adjust the appearance of the finished paint. 
Keep paper towels handy to blot your brushes on. A drop of water from the handle of a brush that you just rinshed, can leave an ugly splotch on your piece.
Some people argue that distilled water is best for thinning with. I just use tap water lol.
Gouache covers well and pencil sketches should not be too hard to cover up. Test it out when in doubt.
Zoom Info

aronjshay:

Hey guys! Here’s the basic stuff I’ve been using. I’ll elaborate more on this later but I wanted to give you the general outline so you can check it out for yourselves!

I’m using Reeves brand Gouache (24 color set) to learn with. Brands like Windsor and Newton can be a little expensive and are often sold per-tube. Reeves has been a good basic starter brand for me so I don’t break the bank. It may have less pigments in it which can mean less opacity if you thin it with too much water so just play with it to test out what you can do with it.This set cost me a little over $13 USD but you might be able to find it cheaper elsewhere or online.

I bought a tube of Windsor and Newton Permanent White for better coverage and mixing. It cost me over $5 for that white but I will get a lot of mileage out of it since I’m producing smaller cartoon style pieces.

I also own a tube of Opera Pink because I wanted a hot bright neon pink gouache. That was over $9 and an investment that I weighed against having a dull pink made from red and white. I can get a lot of use out of it and tint and tweak it with other colors like blue as well. Bright hot colors are harder to produce and thats why they usually cost more. W&N is sold by series meaning some colors cost more than others. Be careful if you start out with that brand and buy single tubes at a store because it can add up fast. It’s wonderful paint though!

I also am using a folding plastic palette. That was maybe $5 and I got it in the palette section of the store. I’ll go into details about why soon.

Brushes are cheap. Don’t worry about crazy good brushes. As long as you keep them from sitting in water, and wash them gently, and dry them— they can last you a LONG time. I use Princeton Real Value line brushes and anything cheap I can find. I kid you not, these Real Value sets are inexpensive and there are so many varieties! Some of the brushes I have came in a holiday issue Reeves Watercolor set and they work great!

My Fionna and Cake painting is on a Birch Panel. Wood panels are cool because they’re flat, and strong. Plus, you don’t need to frame them. The American Easel brand is pretty inexpensive and they are very nice. I stained this one purple with watercolor brushed on to allow the grain to continue through. I did ruin a panel though. I bought one and soaked it in fabric dye to get a bright pink. The color and grain look amazing but the wood bracers on the back warped and bent, releasing from the glue. BUMMER!! I’ll have to hand-brush the color on next time. I still recommend fabric dye like RIT, DYLON and any other dye— for wood staining.

You can also do gouache painting on paper, illustration board— ANYTHING flat! Google around and look at some gouache paintings to see what people use :)

Great things about gouache:

  • Water Soluble (you can thin it with water).
  • It dries super flat and matte (not glossy like most acrylics).
  • You can re-wet it after it dries. Saves you from wasting paint dried on a palette. I’ve found that a few spritzes from a mister spray bottle keep it workable really well!
  • Great opacity! Bright colors that stand out more than transparent watercolors.

Links for places I’ve researched. NOTE: some of these painters lay the paint on thick. It’s not my style, and I’m not a painterly person who blends a lot. I’m aiming for bright graphic looks similar to Mary Blair and other vintage artists. I’m a cartoon artist who is aiming for a cartoon look.

Ralph Parker’s Gouache page (painterly)

The Color Journey (good process outline, painterly)

EHow (lol) explains the basics behind gouache.

Some watercolor techniques that explain wet on wet, wet on dry, if those terms are confusing, lol.

Wikipedia… kinda odd.

NOTES ABOUT GOUACHE:

  • Since it’s something that can be re-hydrated, be careful. You may want to keep a portfolio book or case handy to keep finished work in. It dries quick but be careful because if you rest your hand on a spot that’s tacky, it pulls it all back up. Blah!
  • Since paints can contain toxins, please exercise usual care. Even if it says non-toxic, I try not to keep my water cups near my drinking water because you never know, lol.
  • One artist notes that you can use a clear spray varnish on the finished work BUT he warns to do a test with a piece or a swatch that you don’t care about since clear coats can adjust the appearance of the finished paint.
  • Keep paper towels handy to blot your brushes on. A drop of water from the handle of a brush that you just rinshed, can leave an ugly splotch on your piece.
  • Some people argue that distilled water is best for thinning with. I just use tap water lol.
  • Gouache covers well and pencil sketches should not be too hard to cover up. Test it out when in doubt.
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